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Is Travel Insurance Worth the Cost?

<>Is Travel Insurance Worth the Cost?


 

Originall Published on Kron 4's website

April 21, 2003 at 5:50 p.m.

BAY AREA (KRON) -- The state of the travel industry these days has many consumers worried that their spring and summer trips might run into trouble. You can buy insurance for your travels, but is it really worth your money?

With all that's going on in the world, more travelers are considering insurance for upcoming vacations. Insurance used to be only recommended for certain types of travelers.

Bob Flynn of Scandia Travel says, "It was primarily for the elderly or people with chronic illnesses, where you knew something might come up. In our world these days though, something might come up at any moment and it's well worth the investment."

Still, travel expert Bob Flynn says insurance isn't needed for every trip. Domestic travel with inexpensive airfare may not be worth buying coverage for, however, Flynn says, "I don't think anybody should leave the United States without travel insurance."

International trips, which typically cost more and are more likely to be impacted by world events, may be worth insuring. And a policy doesn't have to break your budget. For example, a $2,000 trip to Europe in May, for two adults can be covered for $65.

Before you buy:

  • Check your homeowners, health and life insurance policies to see what coverage you already have.
  • Know that if a major carrier goes under, other airlines are required by law to take on the stranded passengers.
  • Beware of travel packages that offer coverage you don't really need.

Travel attorney Al Anolik says, "Consumers have to always be wary of what's called 'bundling.'"

If you're traveling as a family, make sure everyone's covered.

"A family is going, the grandparents are paying for it - bringing the children and bringing the grandchildren. Then one of the grandparents gets sick and everybody tries to cancel out and you notice, 'oh, I'm sorry. That one really only applies to grandfather. I hope leaving him home will not be a problem,'" Anolik says.

Above all, shop around and read the fine print. War or terrorism is often excluded and companies that do cover those things may have specific requirements for claims.

Contact 4 also advises shopping for insurance through a travel agent who'll be more familiar with what could go wrong with a vacation.

(Copyright 2003, KRON 4. All rights reserved.)



 

BAY AREA (KRON) -- The state of the travel industry these days has many consumers worried that their spring and summer trips might run into trouble. You can buy insurance for your travels, but is it really worth your money?

With all that's going on in the world, more travelers are considering insurance for upcoming vacations. Insurance used to be only recommended for certain types of travelers.

Bob Flynn of Scandia Travel says, "It was primarily for the elderly or people with chronic illnesses, where you knew something might come up. In our world these days though, something might come up at any moment and it's well worth the investment."

Still, travel expert Bob Flynn says insurance isn't needed for every trip. Domestic travel with inexpensive airfare may not be worth buying coverage for, however, Flynn says, "I don't think anybody should leave the United States without travel insurance."

International trips, which typically cost more and are more likely to be impacted by world events, may be worth insuring. And a policy doesn't have to break your budget. For example, a $2,000 trip to Europe in May, for two adults can be covered for $65.

Before you buy:

  • Check your homeowners, health and life insurance policies to see what coverage you already have.
  • Know that if a major carrier goes under, other airlines are required by law to take on the stranded passengers.
  • Beware of travel packages that offer coverage you don't really need.

Travel attorney Al Anolik says, "Consumers have to always be wary of what's called 'bundling.'"

If you're traveling as a family, make sure everyone's covered.

"A family is going, the grandparents are paying for it - bringing the children and bringing the grandchildren. Then one of the grandparents gets sick and everybody tries to cancel out and you notice, 'oh, I'm sorry. That one really only applies to grandfather. I hope leaving him home will not be a problem,'" Anolik says.

Above all, shop around and read the fine print. War or terrorism is often excluded and companies that do cover those things may have specific requirements for claims.

Contact 4 also advises shopping for insurance through a travel agent who'll be more familiar with what could go wrong with a vacation.

(Copyright 2003, KRON 4. All rights reserved.)

 

BAY AREA (KRON) -- The state of the travel industry these days has many consumers worried that their spring and summer trips might run into trouble. You can buy insurance for your travels, but is it really worth your money?

With all that's going on in the world, more travelers are considering insurance for upcoming vacations. Insurance used to be only recommended for certain types of travelers.

Bob Flynn of Scandia Travel says, "It was primarily for the elderly or people with chronic illnesses, where you knew something might come up. In our world these days though, something might come up at any moment and it's well worth the investment."

Still, travel expert Bob Flynn says insurance isn't needed for every trip. Domestic travel with inexpensive airfare may not be worth buying coverage for, however, Flynn says, "I don't think anybody should leave the United States without travel insurance."

International trips, which typically cost more and are more likely to be impacted by world events, may be worth insuring. And a policy doesn't have to break your budget. For example, a $2,000 trip to Europe in May, for two adults can be covered for $65.

Before you buy:

  • Check your homeowners, health and life insurance policies to see what coverage you already have.
  • Know that if a major carrier goes under, other airlines are required by law to take on the stranded passengers.
  • Beware of travel packages that offer coverage you don't really need.

Travel attorney Al Anolik says, "Consumers have to always be wary of what's called 'bundling.'"

If you're traveling as a family, make sure everyone's covered.

"A family is going, the grandparents are paying for it - bringing the children and bringing the grandchildren. Then one of the grandparents gets sick and everybody tries to cancel out and you notice, 'oh, I'm sorry. That one really only applies to grandfather. I hope leaving him home will not be a problem,'" Anolik says.

Above all, shop around and read the fine print. War or terrorism is often excluded and companies that do cover those things may have specific requirements for claims.

Contact 4 also advises shopping for insurance through a travel agent who'll be more familiar with what could go wrong with a vacation.

(Copyright 2003, KRON 4. All rights reserved.)

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Originall Published on Kron 4's website